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together and celebrate this government put in the great back into britain. >> with the arrival of the consent one of the highlights. [laughter] the other highlight being today passing through richmond. and i would would have loved to have been there to see it, but it that is one of highlights he is quite right this is an enormous opportunity for the country. we're looking to the games to secure a rebellion iestmento attract an addition nam 4 million extra visits and to use the games to inspire more youn people to take up, it is a great moment for britain. >> thank you mr. speaker. we know that the prime minister likes -- forgive me [laughter] we know the prime minister likes to chill when it comes to french relations, she shouldn't he done the more [inaudible] approach. >> the prime minister always ad excellent relations to my expense any president with france incoming with the new president of france. and we should welcome and applaud the standing in today are the largest for french people in the world and of course they're welcome here in the united kingdom whatever their gov
mix. let's go. >> the burmese opposition leader addresses both houses of britain's parliament. it is a rare honor given only to the few. and returning on to britain, a symbol of the fight for freedom, but just how close is she to achieving that goal? hello and welcome to gnp. i am george alagiah with a world of news and opinion. also on the program, will anders breivik and up in prison or psychiatric hospital? spain pays a heavy arts for its latest debt auction, but there were plenty of takers. what is going on? it is early morning in washington, 7:00 a.m. in -- 7:00 in the evening in shanghai and midday in london. the burmese opposition leader is set to address westminster. it is a rare honor. it is a mark of her remarkable journey from prisoner to the international symbol for the fight for political freedom. is all of this too much, too soon for a country that still has a long way to go? more on that in a moment. but first, here is naille. >> aung san suu kyi has already begun her day on her whistle stop tour of europe. she is also due to meet prince charles and the duchess
are changing none more so than great britain and its former colonies. >>> britain used to rule vast areas of the globe. today, the empire is a faded memory and so are the riches it once provided. the country is struggling with debt, government and private. companies are accepts buyout offers from other countries. hear rods has been in business since the 1800s. two years ago it was taken over by a middle eastern investment fund that is based in qatar, formally a british route. jaguar lost its roar. india's tata group came to the rescue. a $2.3 billion takeover deal was signed in 2008. it was another sign of the rise of the former colony and a shock for many britains. but many other accept that times have changed. a view suppressed by british prime minister david cameron when he visited india in 2010. >> britain is actually rebuilding some of its manufacturing thanks to indian investment. i mean tata is now the largest manufacturer in britain. >> reporter: far from resentencing the foreign takeovers, some long established businesses are embracing the trend. black cabs are a part of london's
. so it is for this reason that i would ask britain as one of the oldest democracies to consider what it can do to help build the sound institutions needed to support the democracy. the reforms taking place are to be welcomed but this cannot be a personal based process without strong institutions, this process will not be sustainable. our ledge lagislature has much learn about the process and i hope that britain and other democracies can help by sharing your own experiences with us. thus far i have only spent a matter of minutes inside the parliament and i took the oath as a new mp last month. i found the atmosphere rather formal. men are required to wear formal head gear. there is no heckling. i would wish that overtime, we would reflect the liveliness and formality of westminster. i am not unaware of the same over wishes granted and wishes denied. nevertheless, that will be able to say that democracy has truly come of age. i would like to establish control over the budget. in all of this, what is most important is to empower the people the ingredient of democracy. britain is living
great britain and its former colonies and other parts of the british empire. nhk world reports from london. >> reporter: britain used to rule vast areas of the world. today, the empire is a faded memory, and so are the riches it once provided. the country is struggling with debt, government and private. companies strapped for cash are accepting offers from emerging economies. harad's is a department store, it has been in business since the 1800s. two years ago, it was taken over by a fund based in qatar, formerly a british protectorate. when luxury carmaker jaguar lost its role, india came to the rescue, a $2.3 billion takeover deal was signed in 2008. it was another sign of the rise of a former colony and a shock for many britons. but many others accept that times have changed. a view expressed by british prime minister david cameron when he visited india in 2010. >> britain is actually rebuilding some of its manufacturing, thanks to indian investment. tatar is now the largest manufacturer in britain. >> reporter: far from resenting fall in takeovers, some long established business
of the gold standard in britain in 1890, a firm call ed bering brothers brought out an issue of ordinary shares in the -- britain scowled at the treasury, the treasury scowled back. they got up a fund and presently the city and the uk financial reputation was saved through the intervention of the bank implicitly by the government and overtly by the bankers themselves. it was not a laissez faire system exactly, but it was close to one. lord revelstowe, senior partner of bering brothers lost his estate and his fine collection of french furniture and paintings. we have gotten away from that. we have let lapse, for example, erased from the statute books a law that required in a limited liability banking institution, a corporation, we have erased the law that required in the event of that bank's failure the stockholders would get the capital call. it was, after all, their bank and not the government's. all that is gone. in its place we have the unstining issuance of -- currency and we have the creeping no galloping through the doctrine that some institutions must be favored, some are too big
of great britains. first a different kind of conservative and one of the world's most colorful politicians, boris johnson, the mayor of london. he has a surprising message on the euro and on republicans, and we'll talk about the olympics, of course. >>> then, economics. a sharp discussion between two great scholars, the biographer of john maynard keynes, austerity and fears of a meltdown. looking ahead to the rio environmental summit, a sharply contrarian take from someone who says the whole thing is a waste of time. >>> finally -- >> i am for free press, fair elections and equal rights for women. i can't say that. >> what in the world? "the dictator" might be a fun movie, but dictators in real life are getting smarter, sav savvier and less authoritarian. but first, here's my take. we're now in the general election campaign in the united states. the point at which the candidates are meant to pivot from the primary voters to the general election voters, most of who now are registered independents. but this isn't really happening. the obama campaign started with its attack ads about bain cap
studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. britain is celebrating the diamond jubilee of queen elizabeth ii. it marks her 60th year on the throne. whatever you may think of the institution of monarchy, the queen has led an extraordinary life. she came to power in 1952 before the current prime minister david cameron was even born. she meets with him regularly as she has done with every prime minister back to winston churchill. the past 60 years have seen elizabeth's britain undergo great change, from leader of an empire to member of a commonwealth. but through all of this, the queen's presence represents stability and continuity. >> i declare before you all that my whole life-- whether it be long or shot-- shall be devoted to your service and to the service of our great imperial family to which we all belong. >> rose: joining me from london, suzy menkes. in london, sally bedell smith, her latest book is "elizabeth the queen, the life of a modern monarch." from cambridge, john burns, a london bureau chief of the "new york times." with me in new york, naill ferguson, he's a profes
it is, in great britain and around the world for that matter as today's diamond jubilee celebrations get underway, in london. all commemorating queen elizabeth ii's 60 years on the throne. the queen herself as you can see, there, on the shores of the river thames, a short time ago, leading a thousand-boat parade down the river and good morning, everyone, pretty exciting in london, and martha mccallum is there and i'm jamie colby and he we're here for you in new york well, as you can see, we are witnessesing a spectacle of pageantry and history, millions are expected to join the festivities in great britain throughout the day, martha mccallum is joining us now in london to tell us what to expect. >> jamie: hi, martha. >> reporter: hello there, eric and jamie. >> jamie: we are dying to hear all about it. >> reporter: it is just beautiful, jamie and eric and we have the flotilla is underway behind us and we'd are celebrating as you said the queen's diamond jubilee, 60 years of her reign in great britain, now, this is not something that happens every day. it only happened one other time in t
african leaders. most governments did, that britain and france and we can d that at first. we spent up to 1/6 of our national budget on tribute to the north african coast. finally we decided we didn't want to do that anymore so in 1803 "constitution" is the there as the flagship of the squadron and we were able to negotiate a peace with tripoli and the release of our sailors who were held captive. "uss constitution" earned her greatest laurels during the war of 1812. now, war was declared june 18th, 1812, and "constitution" was in the chess peek bay when word game of war against great britain. she went out to sea, and she had the good fortune to be the first american frigate to meet a british warship at sea. "constitution" had an exciting escape from the brit initial july of 1812, and this painting shows that. "constitution" was sailing up to the new york coast, up to new york from chesapeake bay, and she saw five ships on the horizon, and she thought it was the american squadron that she was supposed to meet. it was sunset so she sailed up towards them, and would you have private sign
of pageantry and history, millions are expected to join the festivities in great britain throughout the day, martha mccallum is joining us now in london to tell us what to expect. >> jamie: hi, martha. >> reporter: hello there, eric and jamie. >> jamie: we are dying to hear all about it. >> reporter: it is just beautiful, jamie and eric and we have the flotilla is underway behind us and we'd are celebrating as you said the queen's diamond jubilee, 60 years of her reign in great britain, now, this is not something that happens every day. it only happened one other time in the history of the monarchy, and that was queen victoria in 1897 and she was not nearly as able and well as queen elizabeth ii is, she's enjoying all of this thoroughly. it is really a high point for the monarchy, and, everybody is very much in celebration of her life on the throne and all that has come before her and, when we look at those shots of the thames, the river lifeblood of london and has an extraordinary history for the royal family going back to the days of hearn viii when he came down here on his barge and that
me! [laughter] chris: the grander story is what she truly means to britain as commentate ors are noting this weekend and last spring at the royal wedding. listen to the commentary as she emerged from the palace. >> the queen with this nation, the servants of the nation and a wonderful example of how to live in the difficult life of monarchy with such charm and distinction. chris: when we come back, as you heard, the queen has given her country spunk. dwight eisenhower's administration, she has been the constant picture of britain plus "scoops and predictions" from the notes of these great reporters. be right back. chris: welcome back. as you can see, we're enjoying some tea here to celebrate the 60 years of queen elizabeth's reign. princess elizabeth of the house of windsor became queen when her father gorge died young. the 26-year-old new queen rushed back from her royal trip to kenya. elizabeth was crowned in the midst of britain's post war recovery. she reigned through the delivente empire and the independence of most of its colonies with prosperity and also deposition at
the falkland islands. 30 years after britain and argentina went to war. >> first, a look to some of the other stories making news around the world. japanese police have arrested the final fugitive member of the cult which carried out a deadly poison gas attack on a tokyo -- tokyo subway in 1995. the 54-old man was arrested in a bookshop after an employee recognized him. 13 people died in the subway attack. thousands were injured. >> paraguay's president is sending the army in to resolve a deadly land dispute in a remote forest reserve where gun battles between police and landless peasant -- peasants occupying the area left 17 people dead and dozens injured. the president says the army has his support to use force to put an end to the situation. >> the burmese opposition leader has arrived in norway, the second stop on her first visit to europe in over two decades. on saturdays, she is expected to give a related speech in oslo, indulging the nobel prize she was awarded 21 years ago. the argentinian president is demanding a return to talks with britain over the falkland islands. the calls come
under water. >> at buckingham palace, britain is gearing up for days of festivities off the queen's diamond jubilee, six decades on the throne. >> midday in london, 2:00 p.m. in damascus, 6:00 in the evening in thailand's capital bangkok, where aung san suu kyi is reemerging on the international stage. the pro-democracy opposition leader from burma has embarked on a tour of countries, along afraid that she might never be allowed back into burma. that is, it's things have changed for her and her supporters. as her freedom grows, she is still prepared to put a brake on some of the enthusiasm being expressed about democratic change in burma. she is in bangkok where she cautioned against reckless optimism, preferring what she calls healthy skepticism. >> after 24 years in burma, this was a first appearance on global stage four aung san suu kyi. there will soon be many more. it was our chance to remind the world that it is still early days in burma's reform process. >> these days i am coming across a lot of what i would call reckless optimism. that is not going to help you. it's not go
there worry about the future. and britain is gearing up for a four-day national celebration. millions preparing to mark the queen's diamond jubilee. >> hello, again. the united nations human rights council called for an investigation into the killing of more than 100 civilians at houla. it also condemns syria for the mass car and calls for those responsible for the violence to be named, opening the door for war crimes charges. russia, china and cuba voted against the resolution. the diplomatic correspondent reports. >> more disturbing images from syria posted on the internet by opposition activists. factory workers forced off a bus and murdered they say, by pro-government militias. on account u.s. observers inside syria hasn't verified yet but they did confirm the massacre at houla and today the human rights council blamed syria for it, urging inquiry to investigate possible war crimes. >> these acts mount to crimes against humanity and other international crimes and may be indicative of a pattern of widespread or systematic attacks against civilian populations. >> syria's envoy denie
neighbors in canada, our neighbors in great britain. i want to thank the commanders of nine other nations whose people sent their beautiful tal ships and crew -- tall ships and crews to be a part of this commemoration. i would like to thank each of you. >> [applause] >> we are kicking off what will be a 2 year celebration. i want to thank the united states navy, secretary ray mabus. we could not be more proud of our men and women of the united states navy and marine core. the demonstration that you have made here with your personal involvement and commitment, has been outstanding. there are many moments i will remember spending time at this place. congressmen who are with us, i think we share a love for this place. one of the memories i will always cherish is looking over those ramparts and seeing that star spangled banner and see the blue navy roaring over. what an outstanding moment. >> [applause] >> in that crowd i've never seen superintendent so many people here at the fort. moms and dads, black and white, grandparents, little kids. it was outstanding. i'd like to make just two points
doing so well. but britain is one of two g-20 countries already suffering a double-dip recession. >> the economic situation we are all talking about here in mexico is as difficult as any the world has faced since the end of the second world war. but i would answer that the -- but i would argue that the answer to these problems, despite the fact that we were one of the biggest contributors to the problems, britain's answer is seen as a textbook. >> but you have delivered a flat economy. it shouldn't you be thinking back about the kind of textbook? >> britain faces many problems and i would not minimize those problems. some of them are homegrown over the last decade when we borrowed. but we are taking the steps necessary to protect britain in the storm and lay the foundations of strong growth in the future. >> after mexico kamal eyes will turn to what that -- after mexico, all eyes will turn to white each country will have to do to spur growth in their own countries. >> we return to our top story, the reports from the egyptian at state-run media that the former president hosni muba
it. >> what would you have done if he had not stood up for britain? >> he makes the important point. bailouts were carried out with britain paying a full part. britain could have been paying as much as 40 billion gyros. this money has been saved. he stood up for britain in europe. >> thank you very much. evidence was needed. this summed it up very good. have you now gone up? >> he is introducing poetry readings. order. what is heard is for people to continue shouting. they are exceptionally well behaved. >> i called for compassion. it is likely to take his life. he also said it was the krolwou. can the government stop this and give him his life that? what they're considering a wide range of things. yes conducted them to review the various reports that have been considered. she will make her decision as easy as possible. there are a number of issues that have to be considered. >> they have recently closed. ? why? >> the money is not being cut. it is being increase. the money is spent to deliver at the outcome. i think this is a decision that needs to be taken locally. >> thank you. g
. >> the leaders of germany and britain face the facts about the eurozone crisis. >> our reporter mes the ukrainian hooligans' threatening -- meets the ukrainian millikan's threatening plans. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- out just what happened at the scene of the latest massacre in syria. the u.n. observers on the ground have so far been denied access. >> the u.n. secretary general ban ki-moon says the observers were shot at in fact. >> the u.n. has been debating the crisis in syria with the international on floyd kofi annan saying the country is on the brake -- international envoy kofi annan cindy countries on the brink of civil war. >> there was an observance for the latest systems of the violence and syria. as many as 78 were killed brutally in qubair. this unverified video was posted by the opposition which is hoping for help from the international community to end violence. the u.n. secretary general ban ki-moon says those responsible must be brought to justice. and u.n. monitors were barred from visiting the village. >> i just learned a few minutes ago tha
spoke of her father's visit to downing street in 1947 to negotiate a burmese independence. britain was also in fighting the burmese president to britain. -- inviting the burmese president to britain. do you think it is impropeis ape brit to invite him? -- do you think it is appropriate to invite him? >> if you want to succeed, we have to recognize that we need the regime to be in favor of that reform and to be in favor of that reform and some engagement between britain and the burmese regime is one way to help. >> afterwards, lords and m p's jostled to get any picture. the power structure has taken her to its heart. >> the lady in london. you are watching "bbc world news america," south correa is try to make trash into treasure -- as south korea is trying to make trash into treasure. there is political uncertainty in pakistan tonight after a judge issued an arrest warrant for the man picked to become the next prime minister. the warrant is linked to a case involving the illegal importation of a drug while he was a minister. this comes after the current prime minister was fired by t
the latest electronic item. 60 years ago, britain had just emerged from all war of an intensity never seen before or since and had slipped into the shadow of the korean conflict. 60 years ago, a new elizabethan era was a weighted with the enthusiasm, untinged with uncertainty about the challenges ahead for the country. if, as gandhi has said, the best way is to lose yourself in the service of others, you have set a daily example, mirrored by our courageous armed forces, of which you are commander in chief, is extraordinary, and yet, perhaps your majesty's most profound contribution has been to the continuity that has made change manageable. the transformation is inevitably turbulent. it has been your singular accomplishment, your unique capacity to hold together that which could have been torn asunder. you have moved with the times and allowed the times to move around the rest of society. this is a different britain from 1952 but not one detached from them. we are in so many ways a much bigger, brighter, and better united kingdom. this is a land where men and women today are equal under th
based on events of the war between united states and great britain that terminated in march of 1815." this title collects a lot of different ideas. it collects the idea it was a rematch and this was about a struggle for liberty between the united states and great britain which was one way of spinning the war. at the same time, it admits that there is this ghost haunting the war that although the declared foe is great britain as professor taylor outlined nicely, the actual sort of shadow foe or ghost foe were native americans whose land rights were being challenged all the time by this expanding u.s. population in need of greater farms. >> the title of your fourrthcomg book, 1812 war of passion and passion of patriotism, was this war essential in establishing what would later be american patriotism. is that what you're referring to there? >> absolutely. one of the things that's fascinating about the war of 1812 is that it is the first time in the united states history that war was ever formally declared by a constitutional process. it's actually just about the first time that war was
. it was the classic mistake of the britain america in that he got out of his taxi, looked the wrong way and was immediately hit by a car from the other direction. what he did was two things. he wrote an article on what it was like to be hit by a motorcar but he also managed to persuade his doctor in prohibition era new york to write a prescription for the use of alcohol at all meals. >> rose: joining us is winston churchill's granddaughter, peter clarke authored the recently published "mr. churchill's profession" and lord watson of richmond, the a patron of the churchill archives center. i'm pleased to have all of them here at this center. welcome. i have so looked forward to this. i was going to tell a story that i once went to see christophers some and he showed me something he had received and learned from winston churchill was how to diagram a speech in terms of indentation so when you read it you read it with inflection and passion. you know clearly about this. >> sommes styling. so you had a sense to make the reading of it as if it was coming from your heart. >> it's boring to act
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,279 (some duplicates have been removed)